DID YOU KNOW?

Before 1993, most testing done in clinical trials and diagnostic and device development was conducted on men.
Male animals outnumber females 5 to 1 in pharmacology studies—and 3.7 to 1 in physiology studies.
Lung cancer is the #1 cause of cancer death in women. More women die of lung cancer each year than from breast, ovarian and uterine cancers combined. Non-smoking women are three times more likely than men to get it. Twice as many women as men suffer from depression in the U.S. It is the leading cause of disability in women.
Women are 2/3 of the 5.7 million people suffering from Alzheimer's disease, yet 66% of the animals used in Alzheimer's research are male or of unreported gender.
Male animals outnumber females 5 to 1 in pharmacology studies—and 3.7 to 1 in physiology studies.
Lung cancer is the #1 cause of cancer death in women. More women die of lung cancer each year than from breast, ovarian and uterine cancers combined. Non-smoking women are three times more likely than men to get it. Twice as many women as men suffer from depression in the U.S. It is the leading cause of disability in women.
Women are 2/3 of the 5.7 million people suffering from Alzheimer's disease, yet 66% of the animals used in Alzheimer's research are male or of unreported gender.

WHAM! WOMEN’S HEALTH ACCESS MATTERS

The data above represents a very small sampling of the inequities and bias that exist in women’s health research. While some progress has been made since 1993, when the National Institutes of Health mandated that women and minorities be included in any government-funded health research, there’s still a long way to go.

Glaring gaps remain. Drug companies and medical device manufacturers are not required to comply with the 1993 rule, so women remain underrepresented in their studies. And even though more women are being included in federally funded trials, many studies don’t report results for men and women separately and women remain highly underrepresented in early stages of drug and device development. The results are that vital questions about women’s health are still not an area of focus.

The lives of women and men will vastly improve through research that is equally inclusive of women and men in trials – and female and male animals in preliminary research. By conducting research in parity and reporting gender outcomes separately, health breakthroughs will be accelerated and health outcomes around the world improved.

 

 
wham logo for bottom of site

JOIN US

Men and women experience diseases differently.  Yet, even today, most testing done in clinical trials is conducted on men and in preliminary studies, male animals can outnumber females by 5:1.  

  • Cardiovascular disease is the #1 killer of women; but only 1/3 of clinical trial participants are female.
  • 66% percent of Alzheimer’s patients are women; but 66% of the animals used in Alzheimer’s research are male.
  • 2X as many women suffer from depression as men; yet fewer than 45% of anxiety and depression studies use female animals.

We need to change this, and we need your help.

We’re on a mission to accelerate women’s health by tacking the medical research disparities that have under-studied women. We’re working to bring parity to health research – including trial research that is equally inclusive of women, preliminary research that includes female animals, and studies that report gender outcomes separately.  

Sign up here to join us today!  We’ll send you updates and timely actions to help advance women’s health through better research!

* indicates required

WHAM! ON INSTAGRAM